Daylighting at the Library

I didn’t know there was a term for this, but apparently I’ve been thinking about daylighting at the corner of Washington and 3rd Streets and at the bottom of the hill at Division and 3rd Streets right by the Northfield Public Library for many years.

Here’s a little video from Streetfilms explaining “daylighting.”

Daylighting: Make Your Crosswalks Safer from STREETFILMS on Vimeo.

Now that the the Library expansion project is about to begin, this would be the perfect opportunity to make some exterior changes in addition to the good stuff which will happen to the Library building.

Daylighting, at its simplest, is just prohibiting parking close to intersections and crosswalks to create better sightlines for cars to see pedestrians and vice versa. The intersections by the Library see much pedestrian traffic, including small children and older adults, and visibility is currently poor.  Parked cars limit visibility which is compounded by grade changes.  Driving south on Washington Street is an uphill journey making the crosswalk across Washington a particularly difficult place to see pedestrians.  As a driver looking for pedestrians, I keep getting surprised by people, especially small people, edging out past the cars to see what’s coming. As a pedestrian, I find the east side of Washington feels safer because the higher elevation gives me a better vantage point to see approaching cars (or bikes).  Standing on the Library side of Washington, I’ll keep my dog behind me as I edge out to see what’s emerging from the north.

High capacity bike rack on Division Street (with Derek & Laura Meyers - HCI Making a Difference winners and Imminent Brewers)
High capacity bike rack on Division Street (with Derek & Laura Meyers – HCI Making a Difference winners)

The problem at the bottom of the hill on Division Street is similar. Creating the high capacity bike parking space did improve visibility at this intersection to the south, but the crosswalk is still obscured while driving south by the angle parking on the west and the parallel parking on the east.

It would be a quick, cheap change to prohibit parking closest to these intersections with some paint and a couple of signs.

Looking at Library expansion plans, there are a couple of changes to the Library which make daylighting an even more appropriate choice.  A much needed sidewalk will be added along Washington from the top of the steps down to the Library to 3rd Street putting more pedestrians near and at the intersection (although the architectural renderings are stunningly devoid of real life parking and traffic).

Architectural drawing of library expansion, east side
Library expansion, east side (Image Northfield Public Library)

The expansion of the library onto what is now the bike parking plaza means the well-used bike racks need a new home and, as on Division Street, a high capacity bike rack on the street at 3rd and Washington would both provide daylight AND bike parking.

Let’s say the quick and cheap paint solution is a big success. Now let’s think about more substantial permanent changes to enhance the Library intersections.

3rd Street intersections
3rd Street intersections

Right now, the 3rd Street parking “lot” has curb extensions at both ends which mark off the space as devoted to parking and slow through traffic; the extensions create delightfully short crossing distances with great visibility across 3rd Street; compare the length of the crosswalks in the image above). The painted daylight spots could become permanent extensions on Washington and Division which make for even better visibility because they are higher than street level, shorten crossing distances, calm traffic on Division and Washinton Streets and create a larger public space for bike parking, benches (many people now sit on the Library wall waiting for rides, why not provide seating accessible to people of all ages?), street trees, etc.

The Northfield Public Library is well-loved and heavily used, it draws people of all ages and is at the heart of our most pedestrian-oriented space. The expansion of the Library is a golden opportunity to improve the streetscape, too.

drawing of NACTO gateway curb extension
Gateway curb extension (image NACTO Urban Street Design Guide)

 

 

 

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