Tag: economic development

  • 2018’s Greatest Hits (and misses)

    Because it’s New Year’s Eve, it must be time to review 2018, right? What I Read in 2018 Although my favorite novel of the year was Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight, I’m having a huge amount of fun with The Art of the Fold, and I failed (again) to finish Gravity’s Rainbow, here’s the list of blog-relevant […]

  • Dear Representative Bly

    So, Senator Kevin Dahle’s tweet about LGA sparked a recent post and now my state representative David Bly’s newsletter has me blogging on a related issue. Really, the issue is how can the public conversation begin to address the relationship between property taxes and their friends (LGA, tax relief of various kinds, business subsidies), the crumbling […]

  • Rarely economical disappointing development

    First, the NY Times series on subsidies and now the Strib has Art Rolnick (former head of research at the Minneapolis Fed) and business writer Mike Meyers bringing the Times’ information back to Minnesota in the context of Governor Dayton’s tax plan in The Subsidy Bonanza. A few highlights: Stadium subsidies are “part of a […]

  • New CommunityMatters partnership

    Some of my favorite organizations have formed a new CommunityMatters partnership dedicated to the idea that people have the power to shape and strengthen their communities; CommunityMatters plans to provide some tools to help do it.  Strong Towns, Project for Public Spaces plus 4 other partners and supported by the Orton Foundation form the partnership.  […]

  • User-friendly planning and development regulations

    Facilitating frictionless economic development certainly got my attention.  Consider this statement: Imagine you are trying to figure out how to apply for a permit for your new (or existing) business, and you land upon a maze of forms and requirements. You’re trying to do the right thing, but the bureaucracy isn’t making it easy. You […]

  • Hospital study

    Why study the hospital/city relationship at all since this is obviously an emotionally charged issue? The city needs to ask tough, even painful, questions because it has real, structural budget issues which cannot be solved by a few cuts or some temporary austerity.  Even assuming the city keeps receiving local government aid from the state, […]